Tekke Asmalyk

Examples of Tekke Asmalyk Rugs

An Asmalyk is a trapping used in a Turkmen wedding procession. Asmalyks may be pile or embroidered and are usually 5 sided.  Yomut asmalyks are most common and then those of the Tekke.




Design: Animal/Tree
Warp: Wool, ivory, mixed with brown, Z2S
Warp: Wool, light brown, Z2S, very fine, two shoots
Knot: Wool, Z2S; asymmetric, open right; count: 11 horizontal (43), 17 vertical (67), 187 per square inch (2,881 dm2),
Colors: Cherry red, orange-red, olive brown, dark blue, green-blue, ivory; natural colors
Sides: Two warps plaited with red wool
Ends: Upper: Red and ivory flatweave, folded over to the back and sewn down, blue and orange plaits sewn on at three corners, 24" long (62 cm); Lower: Ivory flatweave folded over to the back and sewn down; at the edge of the lower end and sides sewn on ornamented woven plait, with dark blue fringe 5" long (12 cm) plaited into the edge.
Purchased: Given to SH by Dudin's widow in 1937
Published: Tsareva, Rugs, pl. 45; Pinner/Franses, Turkoman Studies, p. 122, No. 233






Title: TEKKE ASMALYK
Country of origin: Central Asia, West Turkestan,
19th Century
Dimensions: approximately 67 x 135 cm
Estimate EUR: 5800 €

A flat-woven Tekke Asmalyk with a six railways together set, ivory colored tissue in the basic nature of the tent bands. The pattern with five large flowering trees and flowers in running across the border dreistreifigen is mainly in wool embroidery, but some lots in ruby red, green, yellow and orange silk enriched. What makes this Asmalyk under his points out, are the two opposing riders on a red horse in the middle tree. -- Small traces of age, overall good condition with the original upper extra edge.





The Dudin Merv Tekke Bird Asmalyk





TEKKE Turkoman Asmalyk
  • 4'11"x2'11" (162x92 cm) The pair to No. 11b 18th century, SME. 26-52/2
  • Design : Bird,
  • Warp: Wool, ivory, Z2S
  • Weft : Camelhair, Z2S, fine, two shoots.
  • Knot: Wool, Asymmetric, open right; 52/1 count: 10 horizontal (39), 15 vertical (58), 150 per square inch (2,262 dm2); 52/2 count: 10 horizontal (39), 17 vertical (67), 170 per square inch (2,616 dm2), Colors: Pink red, orange-red, brown, dark blue, green-blue, white; natural dyes.
  • Sides: Two warps overcast with red wool.
  • Ends: Upper: White flatweave folded over to the back and sewn down; Lower: Same. Ornamental braid with dark blue fringe at the edges sewn on the sides and lower end,
  • Purchased: 1901, Merv, "Asmalyk Turkoman, pile, woolen, with representation of birds, decorated with ornamented woven stripe with a fringe at the sides and lower end, 2 pieces"
  • Published: First color publication of No. 26-52/2. Others: Tsareva, Rugs, pl. 44 (No. 26-52/1 color); Tsareva, Hali 7/3 1985, p. 18 (No. 26-52/1 color); Pinner/Franses, Turkoman Studies, p. 115 (Nos. 26-52/1 and 2 black/white) and p. 258, pl. VI (No. 26-52/1); Felkersam, plate 20 (No. 26-52/2 black/white) THIRTY RUG MASTERPIECES FROM THE COLLECTION OF S.M. DUDIN







A Tekke Turkmen Embroidered Asmalyk.
Turkmenistan 19th century, complete tassels and flatwoven embellishments. Approximately 3 foot 4 inch by 2 ft. by 3 in. (103 by 069 cm)







Lot 1
Sotheby's Fine Oriental Rugs and Carpets

New York Saturday 12/16/93

est. $5,000 – 7,000

Soldfor 5,750

s1293n1

Provenance: The collection of Dr. and Mrs. Jon Thompson





Sotheby's Auctions » Carpets » lot 5

Sale N07852, lot 5
A Tekke Embroibered Asmalyk, WEST TURKESTAN,
New York 4,000—6,000 USD Session 1

DESCRIPTION
mid-19th century original applied outer border with multi-colored tassels, losses to silk embroidery, fabric backed,

Embroidered asmalyks such as this were made by a Turkmen bride to adorn the litter for the camel on which she rode during the wedding procession. For related examples please refer to Turkmen and Antique Carpets from the Collection of Dr. Jon Thompson, Sotheby's New York, December 16, 1993, lot 1; Franses, M., "Embroidered Tekke Asmalyk," Pinner, R. and Franses, M., eds., Turkoman Studies I, London, 1980, pp. 164-171, figs. 356 and 351, p. 264, pls. XVII and XVIII and p. 268, pl. XXVIII.