Ottoman Textiles

Examples of Antique Ottoman Embroidery and Textiles

Antique Ottoman Silk embroidery Tomb Cover of the Shrine of the Prophet in Medina With the Tughra of Mahmud II 
Antique  Ottoman Silk embroidery Tomb Cover of the Shrine of the Prophet in Medina With the Tughra of Mahmud II

Of rectangular form, the black silk ground embroidered with silver, copper and silver-gilt metal threads, with a silver-gilt tughra of Mahmud II surrounded by a laurel wreath below garlands and swags flanked by calligraphic roundels, above a diamond-shaped panel of red silk densely embroidered with thuluth inscriptions and rays of light, all enclosed by a border of chevroned leaves with rosette corners and bowed ribbons above and below




Ottoman Textiles Definitions:

Atli Tasvirleri: (Depictions of Horsemen) where men and animals are depicted together

Bohça: Wrapping cloth.

Boy havlusu: A towel large enough to cover the whole body.

Bulyas: Embroideresses

Çeshme: Tent

Çevre: Embroidered handkerchief

Cüz Kesesi: A koran cover usuallu of cloth or leather.

Gemili: Boat but in Amasra it is "flowers on a plate" design.

Gergef was a rectangular embroidery frame standing on four short legs resembling a small table

Göynek: An undershirt or chemise with long sleaves and no collar worn by both men and women in the Ottoman Empire. They could be of silk, cotton or linen and were frequently embroidered.

Handjar: Dagger.

Hünkar Portreleri: Portrait of the Sultans.

kasnak: Round embroidery hoop.

Kese:A bath glove or a small purse.

Kirk pare: "Forty- pieces" embroidered patchwork.

Kümbet: A large tomb with a conical dome roof.

Makrama: Macrame.

Minbars: Pulpit.

Örnek bezi: Sampler.

Palmet Rumi: Anatolian Palmettoes.

Peskir: A large napkin.

Pushide: Sarcophagus cover.

Pushide levhasi An inscribed sarcophagus cover. From Puside - covered or hidden.

Sanduka: Sarcophagus.

Sayeban: A canopy tent or covered liter.

Sikke: Designs such as those struck on coins.

Tugra: Signatures made of letters stacked one upon another that forms a design. The monogram of a Sultan.

Türbesi: Tomb or masoleum.

Yorgan yüzü A quilt cover.

Examples:

The Richard Waln Meirs Ottoman Silk Curtain

The Richard Waln Meirs Ottoman Silk Curtain

An Ottoman Silk Embroidered Curtain, 17th Century. Approximately 6 ft. 8 in. by 3 ft. 11 in. (2.03 m by 1.19 m.)





Antique Ottoman silk embroidery, probably Epirus, 17th c.

Antique Ottoman silk embroidery, probably Epirus, 17th c.

Pin holes and small stains. Approximately 1 ft. 7 in. by 4 ft. 6 in. (0.48 by 1.37 m.)



18th Century Ottoman Silk embroidery on cotton

18th Century Ottoman Silk embroidery on cotton

Country of Origin: West Anatolia, Ushak Region

Use: Panel possibly of a cover

Notes: Panel of an Ottoman Silk embroidery on cotton. In good condition.



A Silk Embroidered Ottoman Curtain, Anatolia, 18th Century

A Silk Embroidered Ottoman Curtain, Anatolia, 18th Century

In three panels sewn together. Approximately 6 ft. 10 in. by 3 ft. 9 in. (2.08 m. by 1.14 m.)





Antique Ottoman Embroidery pair of Ottoman silk embroidered panels, 18th c.

Antique Ottoman Embroidery pair of Ottoman silk embroidered panels, 18th c.

On natural linen grounds, losses to embroidery, stains. Each approximately 6 ft. 8 in. by 1 ft. 4 in. (2.03 by 0.41 m.)



Antique Ottoman Embroidery Leather Document Case

Antique Ottoman Embroidery Leather Document Case


Of rectangular form embroidered in silver thread with the tughra of 'Abd al-'Aziz above crossed spears, pennants and other trophies framed within an undulating band with floral sprays, the back with a central motif of military paraphernalia and crescent moon cornerpieces, the interior of red morocco.

A.H. 1277-93/A.D. 1861-76





Antique ottoman embroidery velvet saddle cloth circa 1700

Antique ottoman embroidery velvet saddle cloth circa 1700

Of two main sections, the saddle seat of crimson velvet embroidered to form a pattern of cushioned ridges, fringed with silver threads, the border cloth decorated with an embroidered band of scrolling flowers and foliage, the edges fringed with silver threads, an attached label with an inscription in an early European hand. The label with the inscription: ''Dress (?) saddle cloth Mrs Edith Hodges wife to Thomas Hodges Esq. 1717''

92.5 by 139.5 cm.



Antique Ottoman Silk embroidery Quilt Cover (Yorgan Yuzu) Panel

Antique Ottoman Silk embroidery Quilt Cover (Yorgan Yuzu) Panel

Approximately 8ft. 4in. by 2ft.9in. (2.54 by 0.84m.). Early 17th century. Condition Note: embroidered on two panels, fabric mounted.

Quilt facings were produced from the 16th century to the beginning of the 19th century. At first they were worked on a fine linen ground whereas later examples were embroidered on a much coarser cotton ground. In Ottoman households, beds were not static items of furniture with dedicated environments but were composed of several mattresses that were stacked away during the day. At night, the quilts would be covered in the embroidered facings with more durable cloth being used on the underside of the quilts and tacked together to form slip-covers. From 1800 the yorgan yüzü were replaced by the bag-like two-faced quilt covers that remain in use today. Such large format embroideries are often described as curtains but contemporaneous curtains were composed of far stouter fabric such as damask or brocade in order to keep the harsh sun out of the Ottoman interiors.



Antique 17th c. Ottoman Silk embroidery Quilt Cover (Yorgan Yuzu) Panel

Antique 17th c. Ottoman Silk embroidery Quilt Cover (Yorgan Yuzu) Panel
177 by 142cm., 5ft. 10in. by 4ft. 8in.

The design of ogival palmettes enclosing delicately drawn flowers punctuated by çintamani is one which was used in other textiles of the period, such as voided velvets and brocades.



Antique Ottoman Silk Embroidery Quilt Cover (Yorgan Yuzu) late 17th c.

Antique Ottoman Silk Embroidery Quilt Cover (Yorgan Yuzu) late 17th c.

Approximately 231 by 152cm., 8ft. by 4ft. 10in.

The fine gauze ground worked with rows of interlocking scroll edged medallions, alternately outlined with tomato red or sky blue scrolls, each enclosing a carnation flanked by hyacinth sprays, all within a narrow arcaded vine border issuing hyacinth blooms and enclosing çintamani.



Antique Ottoman 18th c. Embroidery Wrapping Cloth (Bohça)

Antique Ottoman 18th c. Embroidery Wrapping Cloth (Bohça)

Approximately 121 by 119cm., 4ft. by 3ft. 11in.

The natural cotton ground worked in polychrome silk couch stitch, all with rows of stylised arcaded vines supporting pots of flowers, within a feathered leaf and flowerhead border. The word bohça derives from the arabic word for 'package.' Bohça were used in all aspects of daily life in the Ottoman household, from the protection of household linens and clothing to the ceremonial presentation of gifts.



Antique Ottoman 17th c Embroidered Bohça

Antique Ottoman 17th c Embroidered Bohça

97 by 86cm., 3ft. 2in. by 2ft. 10in. The linen ground in two parts, embroidered in polychrome silks.



Antique Ottoman 18th c. Embroidery Wrapping Cloth (Bohça)

Antique Ottoman 18th c. Embroidery Wrapping Cloth (Bohça)

Approximately 121 by 119cm., 4ft. by 3ft. 11in. The natural cotton ground worked in polychrome silk couch stitch, all with rows of stylised arcaded vines supporting pots of flowers, within a feathered leaf and flowerhead border.



Antique Ottoman 18th c. Embroidery Wrapping Cloth (Bohça) Ottoman Empire

Antique Ottoman 18th c. Embroidery Wrapping Cloth (Bohça) Ottoman Empire

Approximately 113 by 107cm., 3ft. 8in. by 3ft. 6in.



Heublein Perot/Marechal Greek Island Part Silk embroiderey possibly Naxos

Heublein Perot/Marechal Greek Island Part Silk embroiderey possibly Naxos

Approximately 5ft. 5in. by 4ft. 4in. (1.65 by 1.32m.). 19th century. Overcast on all four sides, minor losses to embroidery



A Greek Island embroidered Mihrab Panel

A Greek Island embroidered Mihrab Panel

Approximately 3ft. 4in. by 1ft. 6in. (1.02 by 0.46m.)



Two Greek Island embroideries, early 20th century

Two Greek Island embroideries, early 20th century

Country of Origin: Greece

Date of Origin: early 20th century

Use: Unknown

Notes: Graphically very similar to Ottoman embroidery of the same. 76 by 50cm., 2ft. 6in. by 1ft. 8in. and 77 by 55cm., 2ft. 6in. by 1ft. 10in. including frames. Both framed.



Two Greek Island embroideries, early 20th century

Two Greek Island embroideries, early 20th century

Country of Origin: Greece

Date of Origin early 20th century

Use: Unknown

Size: 74 by 57cm., 2ft. 5in. by 1ft. 10in. and 79 by 53cm., 2ft. 7in. by 1ft. 9in. including frames.

Both framed.



A Greek Island embroidery, early 20th century

A Greek Island embroidery, early 20th century

Country of Origin: Greece

Date of Origin: early 20th century

Use: Unknown

Graphically very similar to Ottoman embroidery of the same period. Compare to a much larger Ottoman Silk. Framed.

Size: 84 by 56cm., 2ft. 9in. by 1ft. 10in. including frame.



A Banya Luka Applique Mihrab Panel

A Banya Luka Applique Mihrab Panel

Approximately 5ft. by 3ft. 2in. (1.52 by 0.97m.)

Banya Luka is a city in present day Bosnia and Herzegovina. It other times it has been part of Yugoslavia and before that the Ottoman empire.





A Silk and Metal Thread Ottoman Voided Yastik

A Silk and Metal Thread Ottoman Voided Yastik

Anatolia, 17th century. One end border reattached, abrasion to the metallic area. 2 ft. 1 in. by 3 ft. 7in. (063 by 109 cm)





Ottoman voided velvet and metal-thread (çatma) cushion covers (minder) 18th C.

Ottoman voided velvet and metal-thread (çatma) cushion covers (minder) 18th C.

Bursa or Istanbul, Turkey, 18th century. First 92cm. by 61cm., 36½in. by 24in.; second 109cm. by 61cm., 43in. by 24in.



Antique Voided Silk Velvet and Metal Thread Brocade Panel, Turkey, Attributed To Bursa, 16th c, probably before 1550

Antique Voided Silk Velvet and Metal Thread Brocade Panel, Turkey, Attributed To Bursa, 16th c, probably before 1550

Mounted, box glazed. Approximately 159 by 124cm., 5ft. 3in. by 4ft. 1in.16th century, probably before 1550

Composed of two conjoined loom widths, woven with a bold ogival leaf and vine trellis, clasped by crowns and enclosing stylised hybrid tulip and carnation spray palmettes with leaves.

Pile: silk velvet; crimson

Brocade: metal thread wound on an ivory silk core

The design of this velvet is on a magnificent scale; the bold drawing and the contrast between the gleaming crimson silk and the metal thread is used to splendid and dramatic effect. The ‘Crowns of St. Stephen’ seem barely able to constrain the bold ogival trellis which springs between them; additional dynamism is generated by the spiralling stems with counterposed leaves which support the thistle-like palmettes. The crowns themselves are a motif influenced by European textiles, but the palmettes ingeniously incorporate a more typically Turkish repertoire of stylised tulips issuing carnation blooms in one register and plump pomegranates in the other.



Atiquen Ottoman Metal Thread Brocade Military Banner, 19th c.
Atiquen Ottoman Metal Thread Brocade Military Banner, 19th c.

The green-gold ground with inscriptions reserved on silver colored metal thread brocade within roundels, the central panel with the inscription in supplementary wefted pale rose pink silk on metal thread brocade, the borders and cross-panel with a crimson ground. The design of these banners is stylistically very 17th century in character, see for example, the rendition of the Iznik style tulips to the corners of the cross-band in the present lot. It has been suggested that the 19th century examples were woven as facsimiles of 17th century examples, which had worn out or been captured, and that they continued to serve their traditional purpose for use in military campaigns. They may also have been intended to be deliberately reminiscent of the heyday of the Ottoman Empire as inspiration for the 19th century Ottoman army. The inscriptions in the borders are a repetition of: Qur’an, surat al-ikhlas ‘Purity’ (CXII).

Approximately 325 by 210cm., 10ft. 8in. by 6ft. 10in. Circa 1866



Antique Ottoman metal and silk embroidery velvet pouch (kese)

Antique Ottoman metal and silk embroidery velvet pouch (kese)

Turkey, Smyrna, dated 1686 A.D.

The crimson velvet decorated with a symmetrical design of stylised floral motifs and split-palmettes, embroidered with the name of the owner below the flap, the reverse embroidered with place of manufacture and date, leather edging and leather inside compartment.

11 by 18.5 cm.

Inscriptions: The name 'Elizabeth Wall'' and on the reverse 'Smyrna Anno Domini 1686'

This pouch is a fine example of its type that appears to have been signed by the artist in two places, once below the name of the owner, a second time below the place of manufacture and date. It is embroidered with the name of the European traveller for whom it was made.



Antique Ottoman Voided Silk Velvet and Metal thread Çatma Bursa 1st half 17th C.

Antique Ottoman Voided Silk Velvet and Metal thread Çatma Bursa 1st half 17th C.

94 by 61cm. First half 17th century. The crimson silk velvet ground with offset rows of carnation fan palmettes.

The design of rows of carnation palmettes was popular in late 16th century and 17th century Ottoman textiles and is found in large panels probably intended as hangings, cushion covers and loom widths, such as the present example, which may have been intended for upholstery.



Antique Ottoman Voided Silk Velvet and Metal thread Çatma Bursa Late 16th Early 17th C.

Antique Ottoman Voided Silk Velvet and Metal thread Çatma Bursa Late 16th Early 17th C.

Approximately 152 by 49cm. Second half 16th century. Mounted and framed.

This çatma with an ogival lattice linked by so-called ‘St. Stephen’ crowns alternating with large flattened flower heads perfectly exemplifies the exchange of ideas and decorative motifs between East and West and the resulting creation of fabrics by Ottoman weavers for export, designed to appeal to the fashionable cogniscenti of Europe. Here, see an amalgam of Italianate motifs, such as the crown and elaborate palmette with very typical Turkish motifs, such as the small stencil-like tulips beneath the large palmettes and the curled saz leaves enclosing flowers (a decorative motif often seen in other branches of the Ottoman decorative arts, such as Iznik ceramics of the period) successfully synthesised to create a bold and dramatic design which continues to appeal today.



An Ottoman silk velvet, Turkey, 16th/17th ct.

An Ottoman silk velvet, Turkey, 16th/17th ct.

Two sewn stripes, worn, repairs. Size 130 x 66 cm
A Silk Embroidered Ottoman Curtain, Anatolia, 18th Century
A Silk Embroidered Ottoman Curtain, Anatolia, 18th Century
A Silk Embroidered Ottoman Curtain, Anatolia, 18th Century, in three panels sewn together. Approximately 6 ft. 10 in. by 3 ft. 9 in. (2.08 m. by 1.14 m.)
A Silk Embroidered Ottoman Curtain, Anatolia, 18th Century
Ottoman voided velvet and metal-thread (çatma) cushion covers (minder) 18th C.
Ottoman voided velvet and metal-thread (çatma) cushion covers (minder) 18th C.
Two Ottoman voided velvet and metal-thread (çatma) cushion covers (minder)
Bursa or Istanbul, Turkey, 18th century
MEASUREMENTS
first 92cm. by 61cm., 36½in. by 24in.; second 109cm. by 61cm., 43in. by 24in.



Antique Ottoman Silk Embroidery Cintamani 18th century Yastik

Antique Ottoman Silk Embroidery Cintamani 18th century Yastik

Second half 18th century. ca. 81 x 62 cm. This Ottoman silk embroidery with a cintamani design on a yellow, coarsely woven silk foundation made up of two panels was used as a cushion front (yastik). An affordable alternative to the extremely expensive cushion fronts made of silk velvet that were reserved for the court. Somewhat stained, otherwise in good condition.