Kashmar Rugs

Guide to Kashmar Rugs & Carpets

Overview:
One of the most popular Persian carpets. A real bargain today in Persian carpets is the Kashmar Rug

Kashmar is an old rug town. I believe that it was a significant rug production area in Safavid times. For many years very good quality Persian City style rugs have been made. Additionally it is a collection point for Baluch tribal rugs.

The formal city style rugs have been made in Kashmar dating back to the 1500s and possibly much longer. Kashmar produces some of the best carpets of Khorasan in north east Iran. One important point about Kashmar carpets is the quality of the wool. The rugs tend to be woven on relatively thin warps and wefts.

There are Baluch in the Kashmar area who produce some of the very best Baluch rugs.

Kashmar rugs from Khorasan may look like a Kashan but (should) cost less.

Kashmar rugs from Khorasan may look like a Yazd but are more flexible with finer warps and wefts.

Kashmar rugs from Khorasan may look like a Kerman but are more flexible with finer warps and wefts.

Carpet Industry in Kashmar
In the past, the city of Kashmar was one of the important cities in Ghehestan (an old name for Khorasan Province of today) and the city was also called "Torshiz". Torshiz was part of a region called Pousht.

Geographically speaking, Kashmar is situated in Khorasan Province, the largest province in Iran, and its distance from Tehran, the capital of Iran, is 926 kilometers with an altitude of 1,215 meters from the sea level. Neighboring cities from North are Sabzevar and Nishabour, from West Shahroud, from South Gonabad, Ferdous and Tabas, and from East Torbat-e- Heydarieh.

The history of carpet weaving in Kashmar goes back to 150 years , and the contemporary art of carpet weaving dates back before the year 1300 (Persian Solar Calendar). However, between the years 1260 to 1280 (PSC) the carpet production in mass is recorded by historians.

The first master weaver in the Kashmar region was Mohammad Kermani who despite his last name was not a native of Kerman city but people say that he was born in a village called "Froutagheh" near Kashmar. According to the historians, the master weaver brought the knowledge of carpet weaving from Kerman Province and probably his first work was ordered by Said Hussein Sajjadi a native and resident of Froutagheh and a renowned carpet producer.

There are some important villages around Kashmar that played crucial rule in carpet weaving and carpet production in the region such as: Froutagheh, Gazkhaneh, Phadafan, Farg, Tarighan, RezghAbad, ArefAbad, and also in some other districts in the vicinity like: Soltanieh, Hidarieh, FiezAbad, Ghouz, KouhSourkh, KhalilAbad, and Bardaskan there were carpet producers who also remained very active in the region.

The villages and districts above started to produce carpets at different stages of time; for instance, in Tarighan weaving had started in 1345 to 1346 (Persian Solar Calendar), in KouhSourkh the production began in 1350 (PSC) and in Bardaskan district in 1355 (PSC).

In Kashmar there was disparity regarding the quality and the price of rugs in early years. In 1330 (PSC), the carpets in the region were in low RAJ (the number of knots in 7 centimeter), low quality and low price. However, during the years 1340 to 1341 (PSC) and with the presence of a person, Mr. Alipour, the carpet industry revives again in the area.

During the years 1353-1354 (PSC), Kashmar carpet find his place and starts to climb the ladder of success and even by the departure of Mr. Alipour in 1358, his designs and patterns were used and practiced by others who had flair for creating master pieces such as Mr. Shojaii whose work gained reputation internationally.

After the year 1375, the booming years start to fade as the market for the Iranian rugs starts to shrink both domestically and internationally.

About the Rugs
It is hard to find Kashmar rugs in anything but a 10 by 13 (6 meters) carpet. So where are the other sizes? The truth be told most of them are sold as low-end Nain rugs.

This picture is an important attribution clue. Take a look at the warps seem raised above the wefts. There is a fair amount of new production that is not in typical Kashmar patterns but if we pay attention to these distinctive warps we can identify these rugs.

Kashmar Rug Structure

  • Structure: Symmetrical knot.

  • Yarn Spin: Z.

  • Warp: 1 ply white cotton.

  • Weft: 2 shot white cotton.

  • Pile: 2 wool singles.

  • Ends: Post-hitch wharf binding with 1 inch warp fringe.

  • Selvages: 1 cord overcastting red wool.

  • Handle: Heavy, durable, soft.



Examples

Older East Persian Kashmar Carpet

This is a Kashmar carpet, Kashmar produces some of the great carpets of Eastern Persia. Great wool and attractive designs make these carpets sought after. One important point about Kashmar carpets is the quality of the wool.



Kashmar Carpet. Kashmar, Persia, 20th century.
Size: 6 foot 6 inch by 9 foot 5 inch.

Structure: Symmetrical knot. 7 knots per horizontal inch and 8 knots per vertical inch. 56 per square inch (868 per square decimeter)

Yarn Spin: Z.

Warp: 1 ply white cotton.

Weft: 2 shot white cotton.

Pile: 2 wool singles.

Ends: Post-hitch wharf binding with 1 inch warp fringe.

Selvages: 1 cord overcastting red wool.

Handle: Heavy, durable, soft.

Further Notes: Very Good Condition.



The Kashmar is a relatively rare carpet produced by master weavers in the province of Khorassan, in north-eastern Iran. The small city of Kashmar is very old, responsible for producing exquisite carpets for centuries. Kashmars are easily distinguishable because of their unique designs and their large size. The patterns are usually historic tableaux telling the story of a significant event in Persian history. Frequently there are views of the ancient ruins and sculpture of Persepolis, the kings Darius and Xerxes, and birds and animals from the Rubayat of Omar Khayam. There are also Kashmar carpets which resemble the classic Kashan, with central medallion and spandrels.


 Pictorial Kashmar Carpet



The Kashmar is a relatively rare carpet produced by master weavers in the province of Khorassan, in north-eastern Iran. The small city of Kashmar is very old, responsible for producing exquisite carpets for centuries. Kashmars are easily distinguishable because of their unique designs and their large size. The patterns are usually historic tableaux telling the story of a significant event in Persian history. Frequently there are views of the ancient ruins and sculpture of Persepolis, the kings Darius and Xerxes, and birds and animals from the Rubayat of Omar Khayam. There are also Kashmar carpets which resemble the classic Kashan, with central medallion and spandrels.


Red-Burgundy, Gold

The Kashmar is a relatively rare carpet produced by master weavers in the province of Khorassan, in north-eastern Iran. The small city of Kashmar is very old, responsible for producing exquisite carpets for centuries. Kashmars are easily distinguishable because of their unique designs and their large size. The patterns are usually historic tableaux telling the story of a significant event in Persian history. Frequently there are views of the ancient ruins and sculpture of Persepolis, the kings Darius and Xerxes, and birds and animals from the Rubayat of Omar Khayam. There are also Kashmar carpets which resemble the classic Kashan, with central medallion and spandrels.




The Kashmar is a relatively rare carpet produced by master weavers in the province of Khorassan, in north-eastern Iran. The small city of Kashmar is very old, responsible for producing exquisite carpets for centuries. Kashmars are easily distinguishable because of their unique designs and their large size. The patterns are usually historic tableaux telling the story of a significant event in Persian history. Frequently there are views of the ancient ruins and sculpture of Persepolis, the kings Darius and Xerxes, and birds and animals from the Rubayat of Omar Khayam. There are also Kashmar carpets which resemble the classic Kashan, with central medallion and spandrels.



Rugs from the Iranian town of Kashmar are full of symbolism. Not only are they of a high quality, but also conspicuous by their decorative character. The common designation "vase Kashmar" is almost unnecessary - vases as symbols of abundance are always depicted in these rugs (abundance of spiritual riches is meant).






Torbat-i-jam Mina Khani Baluch Rug Late 19th C. 



Kashmar Carpet Zir Kakik Design


In writing of another rug Kasra wrote, " a common design for Kashmars and in Farsi is called "ZIR KHAKI" design (reproduction of the old Kashan designs). Which translate exactly to "under earth" and is reffered to designs that depict archeological artifacts found in Iran such as vases and other ornaments with designs of birds, etc. The knot count mentioned is reletively high but not too unusual. 



Torbat-i-Jam Baluch Rug C. 1900 Lot 490




Torbat-i-jam region, Khorasan, north east Persia about 1900, 




Torbat-i-jam region, Khorasan, north east Persia, late 19th century, 




Khorasan, north east Persia about 1900-20, 


Kashmar Area Rugs: Torbat-i-jam Baluch Rug



Baluch Rug

Plate 9

Rug late 19th C 7ft. 1 in. by 3ft. 8 in.

Warp: gray-white wool

Weft: black wool

Knots: asymmetric open to the left all wool

Condition: good

Sides: original 2 cord hair selvage

Ends: kelims and most of knotted fringes

Pile: fairly good

Note: 2 animals in main border. Sold or valued for 18 pounds in 1962





This is a Baluch rug woven in Afghanistan about 1900. It is in mint condition and has all vegetal dyes. Notice the animals on the bottom




This Baluch made in the surroundings of Torbat-i-Haidari is distinctive for its unusual main border and lavish use of white cotton to accentuate the composition. Very good glossy pile material. – Sides newly overcast, good overall condition.



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